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7 REASONS OPERATION MARKET GARDEN WAS AN ALLIED MILITARY CATASTROPHE IN WWII.

7 REASONS OPERATION MARKET GARDEN WAS AN ALLIED MILITARY CATASTROPHE IN WWII.

01. The Allied Airborne Divisions failed to capitalise on their strengths of surprise and speed to overpower German units in the Netherlands.

2. Operation Market Garden had a very optimistic timetable with the allies hoping that the Airborne Divisions could hold out German reinforcements long enough for the 30th Allied Armour Division to reach them in Arnhem.

3. The Dutch lowlands’ soft soil hampered the movement of mechanised and heavy armour. It slowed mechanised advance and forced the 30th Allied Armoured Division to follow a narrow single paved highway to Arnhem. The narrow road left the armoured division vulnerable to German anti-tank fire from all sides.

4. The British disregarded a Dutch Resistance reconnaissance report of a German SS Panzer division near Arnhem undergoing maintenance but still capable of defensive deployment.

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5. Bad weather hampered visibility and resulted in paratroopers landing miles away from their designated landing zones, sometimes straight into enemy infantry resulting in several allied losses without firing a single shot.

6. The Allied troops failed to take advantage of their large numbers due to a shortage of military transport aircraft, which resulted in the airborne divisions deploying on the Dutch countryside over three days.

7. Several British divisions experienced technical malfunctions with their radios, which led to a breakdown in military communications. This communication collapse made it difficult for the 1st Allied Airborne Division commander, Major-General Robert “Roy” Urquhart, to organise an attack on Arnhem.

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